FAQs – Construction “A” Permit

Revised on 10-21-2020

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How long is the A-Permit valid?

The A-Permit is valid from the construction start date specified on the approved permit until the specified expiration date. The A-Permit expires six months from the date of issuance but may be renewed at the request of the Applicant.

 

When does the A-Permit expire?

A-Permits expire and become void (LAMC 62.114):

  1. If the project is not started within the six-month period, which is also the expiration date listed on the permit
  2. If the project is not being prosecuted diligently, or
  3. A-Permits shall expire and be cancelled 60 days after the date on which construction was started if no work is being done or unless a longer construction period is specified in the permit, in which case such permit shall expire at the end of the longer construction period specified.  
  4. The Board can extend the time for the starting or completing the work, upon good and sufficient cause being shown.

 

Will I need a Traffic Control Plan (TCP) after obtaining my A-Permit?

  1. Applicants must comply with the Work Area Traffic Control Handbook (WATCH) manual when performing or occupying any traffic lanes during construction.  Not following the WATCH manual will require the Applicant to prepare a TCP which will be subject to LADOT review and guidelines.  Additional information about Short-Term Traffic Control Plan Review Guidelines can be found in this manual.

 

How will the City determine if a project is being performed diligently?

  1. Once a project begins, work must continue on a daily basis, except for weekends, holidays, inclement weather or labor disputes.
  2. Once a project begins, the work must continue uninterrupted until such work no longer affects public convenience, health, or safety.
  3. The Permittee is responsible for confirming all necessary materials and supplies are on hand and ready for use so as not to delay the project.

 

How is an extension to an approved A-Permit obtained?

  1. Request an extension prior to the expiration date. Include an explanation with your request and specify dates you wish to change. One extension of up to six months is allowed.
  2. There is no charge to request an extension, however, Applicants are advised to diligently pursue and complete their A-Permit work.  
     

Can approved A-Permits be revised, or will a new A-Permit be required?

  1. An approved A-Permit may be revised if changes are a continuation of the same project.
  2. To revise an approved A-Permit:
    1. Indicate changes on the approved permit and plan;
    2. Submit the revision for approval; and
    3. Pay all additional fees that apply.
       

If an A-Permit expires and work is still planned, is a new application required?

  1. Yes, if no construction has started a new application would be required.  The applicant would be required to pay another basic application fee.  All other unit costs would not have to be repaid.
  2. One extension of up to six months is allowed.
     

Screen image of Navigate LA

How do I know where my property line and the public right-of-way meet?

The City currently has an on-line system called Navigate LA (https://navigatela.lacity.org) where anyone can go and lookup information, including property line information.  Simply type in any address in the City of Los Angeles in the search box and any available public information will be displayed.  You may also select different layers on the map by selecting the Table of Contents button.

Is there any way I can get a permit without having to come into the City’s office?City of LA BOE Permit Website Screenshot

Many of the City’s permits are available on-line to applicants/permittees.  Permits available through Development Services are required when an applicant wishes to work or construct in the public right-of-way.

Simply go to the BOE website under Permits (https://eng.lacity.org/permits) and select the type of permit you are interested in applying for.  Once you have selected the desired permit, there will be instructions within each application on what is required to obtain a permit.

It is important to remember there are varying levels of complexity for each permit, and some permits may require the expertise of a licensed professional engineer or contractor.  BOE has varying timeframes for the review of applications and aims to review A permit applications within 2 business days.

Permit for work to be done on private property would have to go through the City of Los Angeles Department of Building & Safety.

How long does it take to obtain an A permit?

BOE will issue an A permit once all necessary documentation has been submitted and reviewed and necessary fees have been paid.

Can you give me a recommendation of a private engineer to help with my project?

Unfortunately, we are not allowed to make a recommendation to the public about who to hire to work on a project.  It would be inappropriate for a government agency to recommend one consultant over another.

What is subject to the Street Damage Restoration Fee (SDRF)?

The Street Damage Restoration Fee is applicable to any excavation work on asphalt concrete streets subject to a permit such as an A-Permit, B-Permit, Excavation E-Permit, Excavation U-Permit and Sewer S-Permit. The SDRF fee will not apply to the removal and replacement of curb, gutter, parkway, sidewalk and/or driveway. The District Office can be consulted for further clarification.

What is the new Street Damage Restoration Fee (SDRF)?

The SDRF is set per LAMC Section 62.06 subsection A.1 and applies to an area that equals the length and width of the excavation cut plus 5 feet on all sides of the excavation. The 5-foot extension area for a cut in asphalt is applicable even if it extends into gutter, curb, sidewalk and/or parkway, due to the fee assessment option adopted by City Council. Excavation cuts in the parkway that are within 5 feet of the street section will not pay an SDRF fee for the extended area.

Will the Street Damage Restoration Fee (SDRF) be applicable to A-Permits? 

Whenever an excavation is made in the street, SDRF will apply. The District Office can be consulted for further clarification.

When is the new Street Damage Restoration Fee (SDRF) effective? 

The new SDRF became effective December 6, 2018.

What are the limits of the street to which Street Damage Restoration Fee (SDRF) applies?

The SDRF applies to the limits of excavation cuts on an asphalt concrete street extending to the edges (typically at gutter edges).

What is a Select Street?

In terms of the new Street Damage Restoration Fee, a Select Street is a street designated by the Bureau of Street Services as a street requiring a thicker pavement design to accommodate greater traffic loads. The Bureau of Street Services shall maintain a public record of its street designations. This street designation is visible via NavigateLA’s Street Centerlines Report, listed under Class as SE.

What is a Local Street?

In terms of the new Street Damage Restoration Fee, a Local Street shall be a street not designated as a Select Street. The Bureau of Street Services shall maintain a public record of its street designations. This street designation is visible via NavigateLA’s Street Centerlines Report, listed under Class as LO.

Does the age of the street affect the new Street Damage Restoration Fee (SDRF)?

No, the new SDRF is not relative to the age of the street.

Does the new Street Damage Restoration Fee (SDRF) apply to excavation work on a concrete street?

Full slab replacement is required in lieu of paying the SDRF for any excavation on a concrete street. A slab may be defined as the area of concrete surrounded by a joint (i.e. construction/expansion joint, etc.). In the event a concrete street does not consist of slabs but a large(r) concrete panel, the District Office can be consulted for further clarification.

Are there any exemptions from payment of the Street Damage Restoration Fee (SDRF)?

Yes, there are two exemptions to the SDRF:

  1. Any excavation in a street scheduled for resurfacing under the City’s Annual Street Renewal Plan within the one year prior to the scheduled resurfacing is exempt from the SDRF.
  2. Exemption for excavation made up to 23 months prior to scheduled resurfacing may be granted after further consideration. The following must be provided at the time of request for consideration:
    1. Complete review of the City’s Five-Year Street Renewal Plan and one-year Annual Street Renewal Plan prepared by the Director of the Bureau of Street Services (BSS) prior to applying for an excavation permit
    2. Prepare and submit to the BSS a five-year street excavation plan and a one-year street excavation plan, in a form acceptable to the Bureau, prior to applying for an excavation permit. Such plans must include the following:
      1. The location of the applicant’s existing facilities in any City street, alley, sidewalk or other public place; and,
      2. A description of all of the applicant’s planned excavation work in any City street, alley, sidewalk or other public place.
    3. To continue to qualify for the SDRF exemption:
      1. Submit annually, by April 15 of each year following the submission of the initial five-year street excavation plan and one-year street excavation plan, a revised and updated five-year street excavation plan and one-year street excavation plan; and,
      2. All excavations in any Local Street or any Select Street must be shown on the applicant’s one-year street excavation plan, and must take place within 23 months prior to City’s planned resurfacing or rehabilitation projects as shown in the City’s Five-Year Street Renewal Plan and one-year Annual Street Renewal Plan.

Can I excavate anytime within one year following the resurfacing of the street? 

Yes. However, in lieu of paying the SDRF, permittee must repave the entire street block from curb face to curb face (typically referred to as the One-Year Street Moratorium).

Are there any exceptions to the One-Year Street Moratorium?

Yes, there are two exemptions to the One-Year Street Moratorium:

  1. Exceptions may be made when it can be sufficiently demonstrated to the Director of the Bureau of Street Services (BSS) that the City’s 30-day notice of a scheduled street resurfacing project was not mailed to the correct property owner of record at the time of notification, and the property owner made significant efforts to promptly notify BSS of any planned street excavations. 
  2. Exceptions may be made on Emergency Work. Emergency Work is defined under LAMC 62.61 as immediate and unplanned action that must be taken to alleviate a hazardous condition, which represents an immediate threat to life, health, safety, or property. This includes continuous efforts to effect the restoration of interrupted utility services (electrical, water, gas, wastewater and telecommunications). Bureau of Engineering’s Special Order SO06-0807, Step 4, prescribes the requirements on Street Damage Restoration Fee and right-of-way restoration for Emergency Work during the One-Year Street Moratorium.

Will the Street Damage Restoration Fee (SDRF) be increased or decreased in the future?

The Board of Public Works (Board) will calculate an adjusted SDRF annually on July 1, in accordance with the California Department of Transportation Price Index for Selected Highway Construction Items. The proposed revised SDRF is effective upon its adoption by resolution approved by the Board following a public hearing.

Do I have to pay a Slurry Seal Damage Restoration Fee (SSDRF)?

The SSDRF was discontinued on December 6, 2018.

When is the Street Damage Restoration Fee (SDRF) collected?

In the interim, the SDRF collection will take place via monthly billing, except for those user accounts that have billing restrictions. BOE won’t require collection of SDRF amounts above $5,000 but can collect payment over-the-counter prior to permit issuance until a revised payment collection policy is determined.

Does the Street Damage Restoration Fee (SDRF) apply to alleys?

If the Alley does not have a centerline shown on the geocoding module, it means that it does not have a section ID and in this case we should not charge an SDRF. The Utility Agency may select “Alley (No Centerline)” under the Surface Type selection within the geocoding module in the Online U-Permit Applications System and that should waive the associated fees automatically.